Ep. 77 - Regina Williams, Republican Candidate for County Executive

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Regina Williams, a Republican candidate for Frederick County executive, says she is disappointed in charter government.

“It has made many things political that weren’t,” she tells host Colin McGuire and political reporter Danielle E Gaines on this week's episode of Frederick Uncut. Changing what she saw as divisiveness in county politics, she continued, “begins with two things: communication and open-mindedness.”

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Williams was born and raised on a dairy farm in Johnsville and said she helped milk the cows before going to school. Her background, she said, enabled her to develop a work ethic and humility that she believed could serve her well in politics and help her meet her stated goal of creating a more civil atmosphere in county government.

 

Ep. 76 - Kathy Afzali, Republican Candidate for County Executive

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Del. Kathy Afzali (R-District 4) says she is “in it to win it” when discussing her run for Frederick County Executive.

The State Delegate joined host Colin McGuire and News-Post political reporter Danielle E. Gaines to discuss her candidacy for Frederick County Executive.

Afzali said her competitive spirit was in some ways forged in her former career as a dancer of relatively short stature on Broadway. She appeared in “Cats,” “Peter Pan” and “Grease.”

In that regard, she revealed that her biggest regret — not only in politics but in life— was getting in a 2012 Congressional race she was destined to lose. Afzali had heard that incumbent Roscoe Bartlett was going to bow out of the election that year, but he didn’t. Afzali ended up losing to him in the District 6 primary by a vote of 17,600 to 4,115 and garnering the ire of local republicans.

“It was really painful and people hated me,” she said. “I mean, the venom!”

Despite her competitive streak, she touted the importance of fostering a more collaborative environment in county government.

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Ep. 75 Pam Holtzinger, forensic nurse examiner

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Pam Holtzinger, a forensic nurse examiner at Frederick Memorial Hospital, joins host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Kate Masters to discuss one of her longest-running initiatives — training nurses across the state to conduct pediatric forensic exams in cases of child abuse and neglect.

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The important but difficult work is suffering from a lack of qualified providers who can conduct the exams. Holtzinger, who served on a state task force that examined backlogged sexual assault kits, also addresses domestic violence and strangulation as well as work to recruit more forensic nurses.

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Ep. 74 - Kirby Delauter, Republican candidate for County Executive

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Kirby Delauter, Republican candidate for County Executive and current Frederick County Councilman, joined host Colin McGuire and News-Post political reporter Danielle E. Gaines to discuss his aspirations for higher office as well as how public office has changed him over the years.

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He referenced unflattering coverage such as the 2015 #KirbyDelauter controversy in which he took to Facebook to threaten a Frederick News-Post reporter with legal action if she used his name without permission. The story gained national traction and generated mocking memes on social media.

Delauter’s top priorities for the county, he says, are building schools, moving forward with a proposed senior tax credit and supporting the Frederick County Sheriff’s Office in its 287(g) program- an agreement to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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Ep. 73 - Student Homelessness Initiative Partnership's MaryLynn Hinde and Ashley Bennett

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Leading the charge to identify and serve homeless students' vast and varying needs are MaryLynn Hinde and Ashley Bennett, New Horizons' program coordinator and social worker, respectively. On this week's episode, the pair sat down with host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Nancy Lavin to share what they've seen, learned and hope to expand moving forward.

Bennett also shares some details from her own experience as a homeless high school student, highlighting the fear and uncertainty that characterized her teenage years — feelings she has seen in many of the students she now helps.

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 Ashley Bennett, left, and MaryLynn Hinde

Ashley Bennett, left, and MaryLynn Hinde

Ep. 72 - Bruce Zavos

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On the latest episode of Frederick Uncut, Bruce Zavos, president of Zavos Architecture and Design, a Frederick-based firm sits down with podcast host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Nancy Lavin to talk about what affordable housing is, how to create more and, most importantly, how to pay for it.

Some of his suggestions are a little unconventional — tiny houses, anyone? — but creativity is kind of the longtime architect's thing. He's also a pretty persuasive salesman, evidenced by his track record of pitching projects to housing developers, community groups and even the residents that oppose the affordable housing projects for which he has designed plans.

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Ep. 71 - Emerge Maryland executive director, Diane Fink

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Diane Fink, executive director of Emerge Maryland, sat down with host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Nancy Lavin to talk about the female phenomenon sweeping ballots, and why it matters to have women's voices represented at every level of politics.

She also shared the story of her foray into politics — Fink served two terms on the Frederick County Democratic State Central Committee — plus her thoughts on a bevy of political figures: former U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski, Hillary Clinton, Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway and even President Donald Trump himself. Spoiler: she drew a blank when asked the first word that came to mind for Trump.

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Ep 70 - Student Walkout Organizers

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Loretta Donoghue, a 16-year-old junior at Brunswick High School, and Chelsea Donovan, a 16-year-old junior at Tuscarora High School, joined host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Allen Etzler to discuss what it was like organizing two very different school walkouts. 

Donovan organized a school walkout that featured more than 350 students leaving the building, where they chanted "Enough is enough" as drivers passed by and honked to show their support. 

Brunswick students stayed indoors, but walked out of class, in part because Donoghue wanted the walkout to be as "bipartisan" as possible, and not split people based on their political views. Students filled the auditorium and wrote letters to send to legislators about changes they wanted to see made. 

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Loretta Donoghue

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Chelsea Donovan

Ep 69 - Varying views on the Monocacy Scenic River Management Plan

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Farmer and property rights proponent, Lisa Bell, and Karen Russell, founding member of the Climate Change Working Group of Frederick County, join host Colin McGuire and agriculture and environment reporter Samantha Hogan to talk about their views on the Monocacy Scenic River Management Plan and if common ground can be found between their views.

Bell has played a hand in organizing landowners and farmers opposed to the plan for over a year through public comments, letters and petitions. Russell has also spoken at several hearings in support of a plan that sets goals to protect the local water. Bell and Russell discuss the plan and their opinions on the County Council's pending decision.

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Ep 68 - Kim Firestone

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Kim Firestone is known for the eponymous — and popular — Firestone’s Culinary Tavern in downtown Frederick. But before he owned the restaurant, he did stints as a newspaper reporter in California, horse breeder in Middletown, and shrimp larvae farmer in Ecuador.

For this episode of Frederick Uncut, the freewheeling entrepreneur sat down with host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Kate Masters to discuss his background as a scion of the family behind Firestone Tires. When his interest in the family business faded, he turned to other ventures — most notably, in food. His foothold in Frederick started with a frozen yogurt shop on the Golden Mile and ended with three different Firestone-branded locations on North Market Street.

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Ep. 67 - Nick Brown, executive director, Religious Coalition for Emergency Human Needs

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The search for a permanent place to house the Religious Coalition for Emergency Human Needs' family emergency shelter might have ended.

Coalition Executive Director Nick Brown announced Friday that the organization is in talks with the city of Frederick to use a city building as the emergency family shelter's new home. Details of the agreement, including where and when, are still hush-hush, but in the words of Frederick Mayor Michael O'Connor, "we are moving closer to some sort of resolution."

The family shelter news comes just under a year after Brown took the helm as coalition director, replacing the Rev. Brian Scott, the previous leader who retired at the end of 2016. On this week's episode of Frederick Uncut, Brown sat down with podcast host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Nancy Lavin to reflect on the many changes he's made since taking on his new role.

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Ep. 66 - Maceo Hallmon

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Maceo Hallmon’s great-grandfather was a man of firsts. A prominent Frederick activist in the early 1900s, Edward Mitchell Johnson started the region’s first African-American newspaper and all-black Boy Scout troop. He was also the lead plaintiff in a 1913 voters rights case, which led a Frederick court to rule the “Grandfather Clause” was unconstitutional — two years before the U.S. Supreme Court did.

Despite his many accomplishments, Johnson’s story was largely forgotten by his family and the Frederick community until Hallmon began researching his great-grandfather for a college project.

On this week’s edition of Frederick Uncut, Hallmon sat down with News-Post reporters Kate Masters and Nancy Lavin to discuss Johnson’s legacy and how his family rediscovered his importance to Frederick. He also told the exciting story of finally unearthing an original copy of his great-grandfather’s newspaper — more than 100 years after the first few issues were published.

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Ep. 65 - Chuck Nichols, Urbana Girls Soccer Coach

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Over the course of his 38-year coaching career, Urbana girls soccer coach Chuck Nichols has constantly had to adapt.

From learning how to better connect with his players, to finding new ways of communicating after a bout with cancer altered his voice, to adjusting his style to better accommodate girls instead of boys, Nichols’ willingness and ability to change is part of the reason why he has been so successful.

On this special joint edition of The Final Score and Frederick Uncut podcasts, Nichols chats with hosts Greg Swatek and Colin McGuire about his early life as a soccer player, his transition into coaching, all of the people who have helped him be so successful and his recent decision to step away from coaching.

Why did he decide to retire now? How much will he miss doing the job?

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Ep. 64 - Msgr. Andrew Baker, Mt. Saint Mary's Seminary

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Monsignor Andrew Baker, of the Mount St. Mary's University Seminary, sat down with host Colin McGuire and News-Post religion reporter Nancy Lavin to talk about the seminary program and his own experiences as a man of the cloth. He also weighed in on the challenges of keeping faith relevant amid seemingly dwindling public participation, but expressed confidence that people's desire to belong to something bigger than themselves would keep church, in some form, alive. 

On a lighter note, Baker fessed up to being a 'Trekkie' — a colloquial term for "Star Trek" fans — and that he's never attended a concert, although he's a fan of country music artist Reba McEntire.

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Ep. 63 - Julie Magers, Justice and Recovery Advocates, Inc.

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Julie Magers wants to improve Maryland prisons.

Magers founded Justice and Recovery Advocates, Inc., a support group for families of incarcerated people and former prisoners re-entering society. She also leads the Maryland Prisoners' Rights Coalition, which lobbies for improved conditions in local jails and state prisons. 

Magers joined Frederick Uncut host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Cameron Dodd for this week's episode. They talked about Maryland's prison system, Magers' first career as a background investigator and the personal experiences that led to her advocacy work.

The Maryland Prisoners' Rights Coalition helped draft proposed legislation setting restrictions on the use of solitary confinement that Senator Susan Lee (D-Montgomery) and Delegate Jazz Lewis (D-Prince George's) are expected to sponsor. Among other things, the proposed bill would restrict the use of segregated housing on vulnerable inmates and set guidelines for alternatives to isolation. 

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Ep. 62 - Marvin Ausherman

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Marvin Ausherman may just be building the artistic future of Frederick. New Spire Arts is breaking ground on a new performing arts space that includes a 300-seat theater and an intimate living room stage.

In the latest episode of the Frederick Uncut podcast, Ausherman sat down with host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Imade Borha.

Ausherman shares details on his plans for New Spire Arts, as well as his upbringing in the family construction business. The born and raised Fredericktonian who runs the Ausherman Family Foundation also discusses the funding his organization provides to the Frederick arts community.

 

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Ep. 61 - Mychal Pilia, certified nurse midwife

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Mychal Pilia knows babies.

For years, the Frederick resident worked in Texas as a pediatric intensive-care unit nurse. After an introduction to nontraditional birth practices, she pursued and received her degree as a certified nurse midwife. Since moving to Frederick in 2015, she’s made it her mission to expand birthing options for women.

Now, Pilia is planning to open the county’s only existing nontraditional birth center.

In the latest episode of the Frederick Uncut podcast, she sat down with host Colin McGuire and News-Post health reporter Kate Masters to discuss her plans for the facility and the importance of birthing options for women.

 

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Ep. 060 - General Assembly Preview

Excited for the 2018 Maryland General Assembly session?

So are we.

In the latest episode of the Frederick Uncut podcast, Frederick News-Post politics reporters Danielle E. Gaines and Kelsi Loos sit down with host Colin McGuire to discuss what Annapolis has in store during the 90-day session, which kicks off Wednesday.

From the big issues including brewery regulations and paid sick leave policies to the proposed legislation from local lawmakers, this episode serves as a primer for those interested in county and state politics.

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Ep. 059 - Life Coach Anne Kelly

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Despite what Taylor Swift might think, most of us can unanimously agree: 2017 was the worst. We all bore witness as the entertainment industry burned, fueled by countless allegations of sexual assault against some of its most powerful players. Covfefe was a thing. The Emoji Movie disgraced screens all over the nation.

For life coach Anne Kelly, though, focusing on the negatives just gets in the way of accomplishing goals. The Frederick-based instructor joined host Colin McGuire and News-Post reporter Kate Masters in the studio to discuss how to improve 2018, from positive thinking to finding the courage to make major life changes. She also explained the secrets behind key coaching techniques, including one her website touts as “the most effective learning process in the world.”

Ep. 058 - Bryan Voltaggio

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Chef Bryan Voltaggio, the executive chef and owner of Frederick's Volt restaurant, is a man who has experienced many adventures. He's cooked for celebrities like Bruno Mars and even jumped out of a plane and then competed in a cooking competition on the Food Network minutes later. Voltaggio was a finalist on Top Chef season 6 as well as Top Chef Masters. But Voltaggio is also more than that. He shares his favorite holiday dish and how he rose up the ranks to be the successful chef and business owner that he is today. 

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